Seasonal Produce: February

  • radishes
  • carrots
  • tangerines
  • turnips
  • Brussels sprouts
  • cauliflower
  • grapefruit
  • leeks
  • oranges
  • pears
  • parsnips
  • sweet potatoes
  • broccoli
  • cabbage
  • kale
  • collard greens
  • beets
  • chard
  • winter squash
  • potatoes
  • shallots
  • onion
  • garlic
  • lemon
  • lime
  • avocado
  • spinach
  • rhubarb

Did I forget anything?

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Freezing Root Veg Crock-Pot Mixtures

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A while back, I picked up a ton of root vegetables and chopped them up.  I mixed them together and froze them in crock-pot sized increments.  Pretty straight forward set up.  Then I just add seasoning when I cook it.  I’ve done cranberry juice, rice vinegar, cream of mushroom soup, along with various herbs and seasonings.  Cranberry juice is amazing with sweet potatoes.  We’ve also added a ghost pepper once.  It make everything surprisingly spicy even though we didn’t eat the actual pepper.

Just put the veggies in the crock-pot, pour in your liquid of choice, add seasonings and then add water until everything is covered.  Put it on low for 8 or so hours.  You can also add in a bag of dried beans, just don’t use kidney beans, they require more prep.  This is a really laid back ‘recipe’, you just kind of throw stuff together.

Let me know what types of things you add for flavoring.

Seasonal Produce: January

  • cauliflower
  • kale
  • cabbage
  • broccoli
  • brussels sprouts
  • oranges
  • grapefruit
  • lemons
  • lime
  • tangerine
  • carrot
  • parsnips
  • beets
  • turnips
  • potatoes
  • chestnuts
  • celery
  • butternut squash
  • cranberries
  • quince
  • pomegranate
  • pineapples
  • rhubarb
  • lychee
  • mango
  • mushrooms
  • lettuce
  • spinach
  • onions
  • garlic

Did I forget anything?

Seasonal Produce: December

  • oranges
  • lemons
  • limes
  • grapefruit
  • lettuce
  • spinach
  • kale
  • turnips
  • potatoes
  • garlic
  • onions
  • carrots
  • beets
  • brussel sprouts
  • cabbage
  • chestnuts
  • apples
  • cauliflower
  • broccoli
  • celery
  • cranberries
  • kiwi
  • fennel
  • pears
  • persimmons
  • pomegranates
  • leeks
  • sweet potatoes
  • radish
  • winter squash
  • tangerines
  • pumpkins
  • quince
  • Jerusalem artichoke
  • horseradish
  • parsnip

Did I miss anything?

Tomato Disaster

**Warning, this post contains images of tomato carnage, if you are squeamish, look away.**

We’ve had a lot of rain this year.  Very strange for normally drought ridden Georgia.  I thought this was good since I didn’t have to water the garden very often.  What my lazy self didn’t realize is that too much rain is really bad for tomatoes.  We’ve lost a ton to splits, had almost all of the plants (and cages) knocked down in heave storms, and I think we have leaf blight killing the plants.  We’ve started picking any with a tinge of red and started preserving them thinking they won’t last very long in the garden.

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*sigh*  At least I’ve learned a lot of what not to do next year.

Stuffed Bell Peppers from the Garden

We were at a bit of a loss with what to have for dinner tonight.  We need to go to the grocery store soon so we didn’t have much to work with.  Or so I thought.  I started thinking about what vegetables we had.  We had some broccoli and ruby chard in the fridge.  Yum right?  Then I realized we also had a wealth of tomatoes, green onions, and various peppers in our yard.  It was exciting to realize we had much more food than we had thought and so I made stuffed bell peppers.

Stuffed Bell Peppers

2 bell peppers

1 tomato

a few sprigs parsley

1 onion green

about a cup of chopped broccoli

a few scoops ricotta cheese

olive oil

Preheat oven to broil.  Cut the stem off of the bell pepper and slice it in half.  Spray or brush the outside of the pepper with olive oil.  Chop the tomato, onion green, broccoli, and parsley and put inside the bowl of the pepper.  Cover with a thick layer of ricotta cheese.  Bake in oven about 15 minutes, until skin of pepper starts to wrinkle.

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We also had some cornbread.  It was really good.  Enjoy!

Multiplying Tomatoes

If you have 3 sisters and they have 5 tomatoes each, how many tomatoes does your family have?

Ok, not that type of multiplication, I’m talking about taking the pruned branches of tomato plants and  using them to sprout additional plants.  I tried to do this with a branch from my grape tomato plant, but I didn’t really know what I was doing.  I just stuck the branch in the ground and hoped it would sprout.

Apparently, you’re supposed to put it in water and wait for it to sprout roots before planting it in the ground.  So I’m trying again with another branch.  It is currently in a jar of water on my front porch.  I’ll keep checking it and waiting for roots.

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Eeek a Ghost! Pepper…

The hero has been wanting to grow ghost pepper, also known as naga bhut jolokia peppers, for a long time.  We both love spicy food and ghost peppers are supposed to be the spiciest peppers in the world according to the scoville scale which measures spiciness.  We looked for them online and only found kind of sketchy websites that sold them.  We had made a contact with a local farmer for next year, but we wanted some asap.

So today we went to Randy’s Nursery in Lawrenceville.  They specialize in exotic plants and water gardens.  We had mainly just wanted to look around and see what we could see, but we also decided to ask about ghost pepper plants.  They not only had them, they had a whole shelf of them.  They also had a great selection of other hot peppers.  We now have a go to place for hot pepper plants.

Anyways, we bought a ghost pepper plant and planted it in the yard.  We’ll see how it grows.

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Athens Farmer’s Market Scores

So it’s still fairly early in the farmer’s market season, there’s only a few things that are ready for harvest right now.  But we went to the Athens Farmer’s Market and got some yummy stuff.  It was packed with people both selling and buying.  We even ran into a friend of the minion and his parents there.  There was a stall selling plants and they had some Habanero and other hot peppers, but no ghost pepper.  He said they used to sell them but there wasn’t enough demand.  He also gave us his card and said to contact their farm and they might be able to grow them for us in the future.  The hero has been looking for ghost pepper plants for a while now, he really wants to grow the hottest pepper in the world.

What we did find there were some carrots, ruby chard, and a loaf of seeded bread.

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We ate some of the bread on the way home and I had some of the chard in a smoothie.  So far everything has been great.

When we got home we checked on our own garden and finally harvested a few of our cayenne peppers.  They’re still green, but we’re excited about growing our own food and we wanted to encourage the plant to make more.  The hero chopped one up and put it in leftover chili he was having for lunch.  The minion and I tried a tiny bite of them, but they weren’t hot at all.  The minion spit her piece out.

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